Telemann: Harmonischer Gottes-Dienst, Volume 1
Click on cover for high-resolution image
£8.50 to Discovery Club members
(member discounts on MP3s also)

Price includes postage and packing

Comment on this album

Georg Philipp Telemann: Harmonischer Gottes-Dienst, Volume One

The cantatas for high voice, recorder and basso continuo I

Catalogue Number: TOCC0037
EAN: 5060113440372
Release Date: 14 December 2006
Duration: 66:53

Fourth Sunday of Advent (TWV 1:1040)
First Sunday after Epiphany (TWV 1:549)
Fourth Sunday after the Feast of Epiphany (TWV 1:941)
Last Sunday before Lent (TWV 1:1502)
Fourth Sunday of Lent (TWV 1:213)
First Sunday after Easter (TWV 1:96)

Bergen Barokk

This is the first CD in the first complete recording of the 72 cantatas from Georg Philipp Telemann’s collection Harmonischer Gottes-Dienst, published in Hamburg in 1726 – the first complete set of cantatas for the liturgical year to be published. The cantatas are designated for voice, an obbligato instrument (recorder, violin, transverse flute or oboe) and basso continuo, and take the form of two da capo arias with an intervening recitative. Although intended for worship, both public and private, Telemann’s cantatas are a masterly blend of tunefulness with skilled counterpoint and vocal and instrumental virtuosity.

Booklet texts (PDF)

Track Listing, MP3 Downloads and Streaming Samples

Track No. Track Title / Details Duration Sample Add to Cart
DOWNLOAD COMPLETE ALBUM 66:53
1-3 Fourth Sunday of Advent – Lauter Wonne, Lauter Freude (TWV 1:1040; Bärenreiter No. 68) (1725-26)

Georg Philipp Telemann, composer
Bergen Barokk, ensemble
Mona Julsrud, soprano
Frode Thorsen, recorder
Markku Luolajan-Mikkola, cello
Hans Knut Sveen, harpsichord

(first complete recording)
10:24
1 Aria (Vivace): Lauter Wonne, lauter Freude spielt in meiner regen Brust 4:22 play
2 Rezitativ: Dort labet sich ein Kind der Eitelkeit 1:38 play
3 Aria: Ein stetes Zagen, ein ewig’s Nagen 4:24 play
4-6 First Sunday after Epiphany – In gering- und rauhem Schalen (TWV 1:549; Bärenreiter No. 4) (1725-26)

Georg Philipp Telemann, composer
Bergen Barokk, ensemble
Mona Julsrud, soprano
Frode Thorsen, recorder
Markku Luolajan-Mikkola, cello
Hans Knut Sveen, harpsichord

(first recording,first complete recording)
12:21
4 Aria: In gering- und rauhen Schalen spielt der Perlen Silberschein 4:52 play
5 Rezitativ: O Eitelkeit, du kluger Sterblicher 2:59 play
6 Aria: Nicht uns, nein, nein, nur dir allein 4:30 play
7-9 Fourth Sunday after the Feast of Epiphany – Hemmet den Eifer, verbannet die Rache (TWV 1:941; Bärenreiter No. 8) (1725-26)

Georg Philipp Telemann, composer
Bergen Barokk, ensemble
Mona Julsrud, soprano
Frode Thorsen, recorder
Markku Luolajan-Mikkola, cello
Hans Knut Sveen, organ

(first recording,first complete recording)
10:11
7 Aria (Spiritoso): Hemmet den Eifer, verbannet die Rache 4:08 play
8 Rezitativ: Was heisst, du sollst nicht ehebrechen 1:18 play
9 Aria (Dolce): Ja, ja, ich will den Nächsten lieben 4:45 play
10-12 Last Sunday before Lent – Seele, lerne dich erkennen (TWV 1:1502; Bärenreiter No. 13) (1725-26)

Georg Philipp Telemann, composer
Bergen Barokk, ensemble
Mona Julsrud, soprano
Frode Thorsen, recorder
Markku Luolajan-Mikkola, cello
Hans Knut Sveen, harpsichord

(first recording,first complete recording)
10:18
10 Aria: Seele, lerne dich erkennen! 4:19 play
11 Rezitativ: Ein Vögelchen, dem noch die Glieder zu zart und weich 2:11 play
12 Aria (Vivace): So will ich dich mit Freuden küssen 3:48 play
13-15 Fourth Sunday of Lent – Du bist verflucht, o Schreckensstimme (TWV 1:213; Bärenreiter No. 17) (1725-26)

Georg Philipp Telemann, composer
Bergen Barokk, ensemble
Mona Julsrud, soprano
Frode Thorsen, recorder
Markku Luolajan-Mikkola, cello
Hans Knut Sveen, harpsichord

(first complete recording)
9:26
13 Aria (Affettuoso): Du bist verflucht, o Schreckensstimme 2:34 play
14 Rezitativ: So ist’s: Seitdem bei Edens Baum des ersten Menschen erste Sünde 3:20 play
15 Aria (Vivace): Frohlocket, ihr seligen Kinder der Freien! 3:32 play
16-18 First Sunday after Easter – Auf ehernen Mauern (TWV 1:96; Bärenreiter No. 24) (1725-26)

Georg Philipp Telemann, composer
Bergen Barokk, ensemble
Mona Julsrud, soprano
Frode Thorsen, recorder
Markku Luolajan-Mikkola, cello
Hans Knut Sveen, organ

(first recording,first complete recording)
14:13
16 Aria (Vivace): Auf ehernen Mauern, auf marmornen Gründen 6:34 play
17 Rezitativ: So lange noch der Unbestand den Schüchternen 1:47 play
18 Aria (Animoso): Ja, ja, wiederholt nur eure Tücke 5:52 play

Artists

Georg Philipp Telemann

Georg Philipp Telemann, composer

Bergen Barokk, recording Harmonischer Gottes-Dienst Volume 3, TOCC0074

Bergen Barokk, ensemble
[credit: Jørn Pedersen]

Mona Julsrud

Mona Julsrud, soprano

Frode Thorsen

Frode Thorsen, recorder

Markku Luolajan-Mikkola

Markku Luolajan-Mikkola, cello

Hans-Knut-Sveen

Hans Knut Sveen, harpsichord, organ

Reviews

These six cantatas remind us just how far Telemann's agreeable facility and hospitable contours would have warmed the cockles of his followers, with their intimate and approachable melodies and expertly clear text-setting.

Jonathan Freeman-Attwood Gramophone December 2006

[…] One can hardly think of a large Baroque collection of sacred music that needs recording worse than this one, although that in itself is a daunting prospect; judging by the standards of Telemann: Harmonischer Gottes-Dienst, Vol. 1, performers, Bergen Barokk will reach the end of the cycle some 12 CDs from now.

Nevertheless, this is an incredibly good start. Bergen Barokk seems to have found the ideal soprano in Mona Julsrud, who has a clear, transparent, and flexible voice that never devolves into modern, operatic-style singing, but is capable of delivering drama where it belongs, such as in the stormy cantata for Laetare (The Fourth Sunday of Lent), Du bist verflucht, o Schreckensstimme. Julsrud also has the ability to differentiate between different, but closely related kinds of vocal ornaments, as in the cantata for the Fourth Sunday of Advent, Lauter Wonne, lauter Freunde. Soloist Frode Thorsen on recorder plays sweetly, but not shrilly, and never dominates the music, even in passages where he appears to be the star attraction. The continuo playing by Hans Knut Sveen and Markku Luolajan-Mikkola is alternatively spirited and sensitive without being over-decorated or bored sounding.

Leaving nothing to bothersome uncertainty for consumers coming to grips with this literature for the first time, as most will be, the book supplied with Telemann: Harmonischer Gottes-Dienst, Vol. 1, will satisfy even expert listeners. Full texts and translations are provided, along with a discussion of the text authors, an attribute badly needed when sacred cantatas are under consideration, and yet one almost never explored, or exploited, by record companies. There are even mini-reproductions of original score pages and a link provided for those who want to observe the printed music in an online edition. All in all, Telemann: Harmonischer Gottes-Dienst, Vol. 1, is a great start to what looks to be a promising series, and if subsequent volumes maintain this level of inspiration and dedication, then Telemann fans are going to have to make a lot of room on their record shelves.

David Lewis All Music

After so much enjoying Bergen Barokk’s first disc for Toccata Classics (trio sonatas by Georg von Bertouch – all premier recordings), I am delighted to see this group embarking on this new project, a complete recording of the 72 sacred cantatas that comprise Telemann’s "Harmonischer Gottes-Dienst", of which this is the first volume. Again, Bergen Barokk is exploring new territory: much of Telemann's collection, the first complete cantata cycle for the church year ever to be published (in 1726), has never been recorded before. The present volume contains six cantatas, all of which are scored for high voice (here a soprano), recorder obbligato and basso continuo. Each follows the same aria-recitative-aria pattern while making extensive use of melodic and harmonic word-painting.

These are delightful works, melodically attractive and short enough to appeal to those of us who prefer ‘sacred sound-bites’ to, say, Bach’s mighty edifices. Mona Julsrud sings with great clarity and beauty of tone while eschewing undue emphasis on already salient features, allowing Telemann’s effective writing to carry the day. Her ornamentation on the A-section repeats of the da capo arias is crisply executed, as is recorder-player Frode Thorsen’s, who elsewhere is given much work to do by way of instrumental introductions, and the ritornelli are an almost continuous counterpoint to the vocal line. His affecting tone and expressive phrasing greatly contributes to the elucidation of the text. Hans Knut Sveen fills out Markku Luolajan-Mikkola’s sometimes lively bass-line with great taste while being ever-attentive to the soloists.

The recorded sound perfectly conveys the requisite intimacy; Thorsen’s booklet notes are superb, with much background information and analysis. Full translations of the German texts are provided, as are the biblical texts on which the cantatas are a commentary.

William Yeoman Classical Source

Comments

0 comments – add a comment