Bacevičius: Orchestral Music
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Vytautas Bacevičius: Orchestral Music

Catalogue Number: TOCC0049
EAN: 5060113440495
Release Date: 26 June 2007
Duration: 66:15

Poème Électrique
Piano Concerto No. 1, Sur les thèmes lituaniens
Symphony No. 2, Della Guerra
Symphony No. 6, Cosmique
Graphique

Aidas Puodžiukas, piano
Lithuanian State Symphony Orchestra, orchestra
Vytautas Lukočius, conductor
Martynas Staškus, conductor

The Lithuanian pianist and composer Vytautas Bacevičius (1905-70) is one of the undiscovered radicals of the twentieth century. The early works on this CD show him finding his voice, as in the First Piano Concerto, with its echoes of Scriabin, and the Poème électrique, cast in the ‘machinist’ aesthetic in vogue in the 1920s and ’30s. The programmatic Second Symphony depicts the onset of the Second World War which Bacevičius, desperately anxious about his family in Poland and Lithuania, followed from his exile in the New World. And the late Sixth Symphony and Graphique, which show a kaleidoscopic, pointilliste use of orchestral colour, boiling with violent energy, point to an entirely new musical language.

Booklet texts   (PDF)

Track Listing, MP3 Downloads and Streaming Samples

Track No. Track Title / Details Duration Sample Add to Cart
DOWNLOAD COMPLETE ALBUM 66:15
1 Poème Électrique (1932)

Vytautas Bacevičius, composer
Lithuanian State Symphony Orchestra, orchestra
Vytautas Lukočius, conductor

(first recording)
5:30 play
2 Concerto No. 1 for Piano and Orchestra, Sur les thèmes lituaniens (1929)

Vytautas Bacevičius, composer
Aidas Puodžiukas, piano
Lithuanian State Symphony Orchestra, orchestra
Martynas Staškus, conductor

(first recording)
14:20 play
3-5 Symphony No. 2, Della Guerra (1940)

Vytautas Bacevičius, composer
Lithuanian State Symphony Orchestra, orchestra
Vytautas Lukočius, conductor

(first recording)
21:10
3 I. Allegro 7:53 play
4 II. Andante funebre 8:15 play
5 III. Allegro molto 5:02 play
6 Symphony No. 6, Cosmique (1960)

Vytautas Bacevičius, composer
Lithuanian State Symphony Orchestra, orchestra
Vytautas Lukočius, conductor

(first recording)
12:58 play
7 Graphique (1964)

Vytautas Bacevičius, composer
Lithuanian State Symphony Orchestra, orchestra
Vytautas Lukočius, conductor

(first recording)
12:17 play

Artists

Vytautas Bacevičius

Vytautas Bacevičius, composer
[credit: J. Abresch, N.Y.]

Aidas Puodžiukas

Aidas Puodžiukas, piano

Lithuanian State Symphony Orchestra

Lithuanian State Symphony Orchestra, orchestra
[credit: Dmitrijus Matvejevas]

Vytautas Lukočius

Vytautas Lukočius, conductor

Martynas Staškus

Martynas Staškus, conductor

Reviews

Review

Tim Ashley The Guardian 10th August 2007

The first disc devoted to the music of Lithuania’s forgotten musical pioneer

Vytautas Bacevicius was born into a Polish-Lithuanian family in Lódz, Poland, in 1905, but emigrated to the then Lithuanian capital, Kaunas, in 1926. He studied in Paris with Tcherepnin (1927-31) and was much influenced by Scriabin and, later, Varèse and Jolivet. A fine pianist, Bacevicius thought of himself foremost as an orchestral composer.

The four sections of the single-span first of four piano concertos (1929) mirrors a traditional sonata-style layout in which folk material forms the motivic basis set in Scriabinesque harmonies. The concluding Allegro moderato, however, is almost jazzlike in its rhythmic élan – an echo, perhaps, of his Parisian sojourn. More impressive still is Poème électrique (1932), a highly coloured contribution to the short-lived machinist fad of the times. Closer to The Steel Stride than Pacific 231 or Iron Foundry, it is a most effective concert opener.

When the Second World War overtook Lithuania and Poland in 1939, Bacevicius was on tour in South America and he remained an exile (mostly in the US) until his death in 1970. The programmatic Second Symphony (1940) records his feelings at the invasion of his homelands in a simplified musical language, conceived (unsuccessfully) for America, that failed to secure attention. In the late 1950s he returned to a more advanced style, a “cosmic music” (of the inner cosmos of Man rather than Space), represented here by the turbulent Sixth Symphony (1960) and brilliant Graphique (1964) – the latter in particular showing what a fine composer Bacevicius was at his best. These fine performances and recordings (from 2003‑05) give this colourful music the best possible platform.

Guy Rickards Gramophone

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