Raykhelson: Jazz Suite and other works
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Igor Raykhelson: Jazz Suite and other works

Catalogue Number: TOCC0055
EAN: 5060113440556
Release Date: 3 September 2007
Duration: 67:00

Little Symphony for Strings in G minor
Reflections for Violin, Viola and Strings
Adagio for Viola and Strings
Jazz Suite for Viola, Saxophone and Orchestra

Igor Raykhelson, piano
Yuri Bashmet, viola, conductor
Elena Revich, violin
Igor Butman, saxophone
Yuri Golubev, double-bass
Eduard Zizak, drums
Moscow-Soloists, ensemble

In the words of his friend the violist and conductor Yuri Bashmet, the composer-pianist Igor Raykhelson – born in Leningrad in 1961 and now resident in New York – ‘possesses a superb mastery of both classical and jazz idioms’. The highly individual fusion of styles that results, Bashmet continues, ‘elevates his music over that of many other composers creating in the genre often referred to as “crossover”’. The Jazz Suite on this CD exhibits Raykhelson’s popular style at its most infectiously catchy; the other three works here – in the Russian tradition of writing for strings initiated by Tchaikovsky – present the more classical side of his muse.

Booklet texts   (PDF)

Track Listing, MP3 Downloads and Streaming Samples

Track No. Track Title / Details Duration Sample Add to Cart
DOWNLOAD COMPLETE ALBUM 67:00
1-4 Little Symphony for Strings in G minor (2005)

Igor Raykhelson, composer
Moscow-Soloists, ensemble

(first recording)
19:31
1 I. Alla Waltz 7:26 play
2 II. Scherzando 1:35 play
3 III. Adagio 5:47 play
4 IV. Allegro 4:43 play
5 Reflections for Violin, Viola and Strings (2005)

Igor Raykhelson, composer
Yuri Bashmet, conductor, viola
Elena Revich, violin
Moscow-Soloists, ensemble

(first recording)
9:54 play
6 Adagio for Viola and Strings (2005)

Igor Raykhelson, composer
Yuri Bashmet, conductor, viola
Moscow-Soloists, ensemble

(first recording)
5:58 play
7-13 Jazz Suite for Viola, Saxophone and Orchestra (2005)

Igor Raykhelson, composer, piano
Yuri Bashmet, conductor, viola
Igor Butman, saxophone
Yuri Golubev, double-bass
Eduard Zizak, drums
Moscow-Soloists, ensemble

(first recording)
31:37
7 I. Theme 4:49 play
8 II. Fusion 3:27 play
9 III. Jazz Waltz – "Take Three" 5:06 play
10 IV. Fugue 1:31 play
11 V. Swing 2:54 play
12 VI. Consolation 5:40 play
13 VII. Finale 8:10 play

Artists

Igor-Raykhelson

Igor Raykhelson, composer, piano

Yuri Bashmet

Yuri Bashmet, viola, conductor

Elena Revich

Elena Revich, violin

Igor Butman

Igor Butman, saxophone

Yuri Golubev

Yuri Golubev, double-bass

Eduard Zizak

Eduard Zizak, drums

Moscow Soloists

Moscow-Soloists, ensemble

Reviews

The Adagio for viola and strings is a beautiful work, with a strong sense of emotion. Bashmet plays with richness of tone and musical elegance....This was an interesting disc, with some lovely moments....[W]orthy of exploration.

Carla Rees MusicWeb International March 2008

Beautifully Played

Patric Standford Music & Vision 2nd February 2008

Back in the 1920s, composers such as Gershwin, Antheil, Milhaud and Stravinsky were able to create a convincing fusion of so-called classical and jazz elements in their music. More recently, however, attempts to bridge these two musical idioms have been far less convincing, the results often sounding stiff or opportunistically commercial. Fortunately none of these criticisms can be leveled against the Russian-born pianist and composer Igor Raykhelson whose seven-movement Jazz Suite featuring the distinctive talents of saxophonist Igor Butman and charismatic violist Yuri Bashmet, must be regarded as one of the most exhilarating and inventive works of its kind.

The secret rests with Raykhelson’s striking harmonic language, owing something to Shostakovich but also permeated with jazz inflections, and strongly memorable melodic ideas. These gifts also stand him in particularly good stead in the more introspective Reflections for violin, viola and strings, both projected with evident affection by the work’s original performers. Structurally the Little Symphony for Strings may ramble in places, though once again the combination of Raykhelson’s natural fluency, the persuasive playing of the Moscow Soloists and fine engineering sweeps away and lingering doubts.

Erik Levi BBC Music Magazine February 2008

COMPOSERS were big losers in the collapse of communism. Unwanted in the new Russia, they dispersed abroad, seeking a meagre livelihood.

Raykhelson, 46, born in Leningrad, plies jazz clubs and chamber halls in New York. His Little Symphony for Strings is a deceptively classical piece with lashings of ironic commentary, rather like the young Prokofiev visiting the Chernobyl disaster site. Even more captivating is a five-minute Adagio for viola and strings that Yuri Bashmet delivers tenderly and without virtuosic showiness as an internal meditation on dashed idylls — perfect for late-night listening.

The second half of the disc is a jazz suite for viola, saxophone and band, part scored, part improvised, a cross between New Orleans nostalgia and Soviet-era samizdat gatherings where musicians shook off the shackles of state and let it swing for a few hours of free expression.

Raykhelson is the latest discovery on Toccata Classics, a British label devoted to neglected composers. He won't be ignored much longer.

Evening Standard 15th August 2007

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