Tartini: Sonate piccole, Volume 1
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Giuseppe Tartini: 30 Sonate piccole, Volume One

Sonatas Nos. 1–6

Catalogue Number: TOCC0146
EAN: 5060113441461
Release Date: 3 December 2012
Duration: 59:19

Sonata No. 1 in G major
Sonata No. 2 in D minor
Sonata No. 3 in D Major
Sonata No. 4 in C major
Sonata No. 5 in F major
Sonata No. 6 in E minor

Peter Sheppard Skærved, violin

In the last years of his life, the great composer, violinist and swordsman Giuseppe Tartini (1692–1770) laboured at a cycle of sonatas for solo violin. The resulting manuscript offers the most important composition for solo violin after Bach and, at six hours in duration, the largest integrated work for the instrument. This first complete recording is based on a fresh study of the source and includes a number of works in Tartini’s shorthand, overlooked in earlier editions.

Booklet texts   (PDF)

Track Listing, MP3 Downloads and Streaming Samples

Track No. Track Title / Details Duration Sample Add to Cart
DOWNLOAD COMPLETE ALBUM 59:19
1-4 Sonata No. 1 in G major (mid 18th c.)

Giuseppe Tartini, composer
Peter Sheppard Skærved, violin

(first complete recording)
15:36
1 I Molto andante 4:17 play
2 II Allegro cantabile 6:49 play
3 III Allegro 1:03 play
4 IV Giga 3:27 play
5-7 Sonata No. 2 in D minor (mid 18th c.)

Giuseppe Tartini, composer
Peter Sheppard Skærved, violin

(first complete recording)
7:10
5 I Siciliana 2:54 play
6 II Allegro 2:11 play
7 III Allegro affettuoso 2:05 play
8-11 Sonata No. 3 in D Major (mid 18th c.)

Giuseppe Tartini, composer
Peter Sheppard Skærved, violin

(first complete recording)
7:54
8 I Andante Cantabile 2:26 play
9 II Allegro 1:47 play
10 III Giga 2:30 play
11 IV Allegro assai 1:11 play
12-15 Sonata No. 4 in C major (mid 18th c.)

Giuseppe Tartini, composer
Peter Sheppard Skærved, violin

(first complete recording)
11:00
12 I Andante cantabile 2:39 play
13 II Allegro assai 2:54 play
14 III Grave 4:19 play
15 IV Presto 1:08 play
16-19 Sonata No. 5 in F major (mid 18th c.)

Giuseppe Tartini, composer
Peter Sheppard Skærved, violin

(first complete recording)
10:09
16 I Andante cantabile 2:30 play
17 II Allegro 2:44 play
18 III Allegro assai 2:23 play
19 IV Il tormento di questo cuore 2:32 play
20-22 Sonata No. 6 in E minor (mid 18th c.)

Giuseppe Tartini, composer
Peter Sheppard Skærved, violin

(first complete recording)
7:30
20 I Andante cantabilesenti lo mare 2:37 play
21 II Allegro cantabile 2:35 play
22 III Giga 2:18 play

Artists

Giuseppe Tartini

Giuseppe Tartini, composer

Peter Sheppard Skærved

Peter Sheppard Skærved, violin
[credit: Matt Grum]

Reviews

A pleasure from start to finish

There is simply no end to the treasurable music of the Baroque era. What is not already well-known seems just a short way away from being discovered or rediscovered, and what has not been performed anytime recently will surely show up in the concert hall or recorded form quite soon. That so much excellent music has essentially lain fallow for such a long time is an accident of history, now corrected through interest in historic performance practices and a renewed level of attention being paid to composers of Baroque times other than Bach and Vivaldi (but still including them). The case of Giuseppe Tartini’s Sonate piccole for solo violin is instructive. Tartini (1692–1770) is nowadays known almost solely for his ‘Devil’s Trill’ sonata, but there is a great deal more to him and his music than that. A very highly regarded violinist as well as much-admired composer, Tartini in his later years set about creating a cycle of sonatas for violin solo, and ended up writing 30 of them – creating a six-hour grouping that, taken collectively, is the largest integrated work ever written for the instrument. And the sonatas are far more than dry studies: each is carefully structured and elegantly constructed, with virtuoso elements kept at the service of poised and effective music-making. At least that is so in the case of the first six, which are excellently played by Peter Sheppard Skærved on a Toccata Classics CD that is the first volume of the first-ever complete recording of these works. Skærved has a fine sense of Baroque style and an understated virtuosity that fits these pieces very well. He is suitably upbeat, even celebratory, in the major-key works (Nos. 1 in G, 3 in D, 4 in C and the somewhat more understated No. 5 in F); and he brings tenderness and slight melancholy – but only to an appropriate degree – to those in minor keys (Nos. 2 in D minor and 6 in E minor). A full hour of solo-violin music can be a lot to listen to, but just as with Bach’s solo-violin works, Tartini’s encompass such a wide range of moods and techniques, and contain so much that is interesting both technically and emotionally, that they are a pleasure from start to finish.

The Infodad Team Infodad.com 24th January 2013

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